The definition of dead...

There has been much talk in the tech community about how Flash, (and to some extent Silverlight) is now dead. This is amid announcements from Adobe, that they are discontinuing support for flash mobile. The GIS community tends to adopt technology on the coattails of the greater tech communities' adoptions. Some talking heads in the greater tech community are proclaiming that Flash is dead! Silverlight is dead! Now as one would expect, some GIS talking heads are analogously shouting flex is dead! Silverlight is dead! The folks in the community who are shouting these things are usually GIS Entrepreneurs who have heavily-vested their incomes on custom (non-out-of-the-box) solutions.-- Not that there is anything wrong with that...I'll point you to a tweet from a tech podcaster/journalist that I follow, Joshua Topolsky, "Pronouncing something as dead, is usually a sign that it is very much alive."HTML5 is the future. It's non-proprietary, more foot-loose, and it will allow for much more flexibility when designing applications that run in the mobile space. However, Flex/Flash, and Silverlight are in the present-tense-- which is not in the past. Therefore, I would not call it dead. Stop calling things dead. It's cute, and you'll definitely get some attention for it. However it shows an utter ignorance as to how things are currently working in the present-tense. I seriously doubt that the Esri UC will be filled with HTML5-only apps. Get with the times man. You've saddled up on the "it's dead" tech bandwagon and tried to to apply its ridiculous principles to the present-tense in GIS. Those attending the Esri UC should be looking at the problems that are solved using GIS. It would be a shame if people were fixated on how current or hip the platform is that gets you there. These are the same dudes who are leading the no-sql, no-gis boutique movements to no-where.Esri's been very smart in their approach to the community talk of HTML5 and the future of their platforms. They have not proclaimed anything as dead, and they have seen that HTML5 is part of the future landscape.Many in the community cite Google as leading the charge for HTML5. Whilst Google is a huge backer of HTML5, there's a reality check-- In the PRESENT-TENSE a little Geospatial app called Street-View (not sure if you've heard of it) on Google Maps, still leverages Adobe Flash.This landscape is in-fact changing. There's a really good podcast by Directions Mag how far we have come, and what we might expect from HTML5.I look forward expanding my horizons in GIS by learning how to leverage/customize apps that run on HTML5 in the FUTURE. However I'm currently (Present-tense) building geospatial web applications that run on Adobe Flex. The environment fits my clients needs, and there is great support from a community of developers that's building widgets on top of this platform.My only point in writing this little post, is to hopefully arm folks with enough ammunition the next time they hear someone say "that's dead". There is a difference between the Past, Present, and Future. Don't believe all the hype. HTML5 is the future, however it has not gained a critical mass in Geospatial usage. Be proud of your Flex/Silverlight apps. They are allowing you to share information that helps to solve todays problems in the PRESENT-TENSE. So long as they continue to do this, there is no reason why you should abandon them. You'll never hear me proclaim that any technology is dead.-- It's always good to keep your options open, use tools that solve todays problems, and keep abreast of what's on the horizon.A very smart past co-worker of mine told me something that stuck with me years ago, "Never apply technology for technology's sake". Cheers,Alex